Yulia Tsvetkov

yulia I am an assistant professor in the Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering, at the University of Washington. I work on Natural Language Processing–a subfield of computer science focusing on computational processing of human languages. I am particularly interested in hybrid solutions at the intersection of machine learning and theoretical or social linguistics, i.e., solutions that combine sophisticated learning/modeling methods and insights about human languages or about people speaking these languages.

Much of my research group's work focuses on NLP for social good, multilingual NLP, and language generation. This research is motivated by a unified goal: to extend the capabilities of human language technology beyond individual populations and across language boundaries, thereby enabling NLP for diverse and disadvantaged users, the users that need it most. Here are my CV and Google Scholar page.

Previously, I was an assistant professor in the Language Technologies Institute, School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University, and before that a postdoc in the Stanford NLP Group. I got my PhD from CMU.

Teaching

  • Spring 2021 - Computational Ethics Lab;
  • Fall 2020 - Multilingual NLP (graduate course; co-teaching with Graham Neubig and Alan W Black; Algorithms for NLP (graduate course; co-teaching with Emma Strubell and Robert Frederking
  • Spring 2020 - Computational Ethics for NLP (graduate course; co-teaching with Alan W Black);
    Algorithms for NLP (undergraduate IITP course; co-teaching with David Mortensen)
  • Fall 2020 - Algorithms for NLP (graduate course; co-teaching with Emma Strubell and Robert Frederking
  • Fall 2019 - Algorithms for NLP (graduate course; co-teaching with Robert Frederking);
    Algorithms for NLP (undergraduate IITP course; co-teaching with David Mortensen)
  • Spring 2019 - Computational Ethics for NLP (graduate course; co-teaching with Alan W Black)
  • Fall 2018 - Algorithms for NLP (graduate course; co-teaching with Robert Frederking)
  • Spring 2018 - Computational Ethics for NLP (graduate course; co-teaching with Alan W Black)
  • Publications